. Sections 7 and 8 of the NLRA. Section 7 protects the right of employees to engage in “concerted activities” with each other for the purpose of collective bargaining or in efforts to improve working conditions and terms of employment. Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act is essential for a clear understanding of Section 8 of the act. NLRB Narrows the Scope of NLRA Section 7 Protection for Employee Complaints. § 153–156), is the primary enforcer of the Act. § 157. National Labor Relations Board. What are the analytical and substantive differences between work stoppages protected under Section 7 of the NLRA as protected concerted activity, and those protected under Section 502? Section 8(a)(1) of the NLRA makes it an unfair labor practice for an employer to deny or limit the Section 7 rights of employees. 1612 … § 157). The National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) of 1935, also referred to as the Wagner Act, was a major reason for this change. Kayla A. McCann Milwaukee Author. First, a work stoppage protected under Section 7 requires the element of “concertedness,” where two … Section 8(b)(2) makes it illegal for a union to cause an employer to discriminate in violation of Section 8(a)(3). § 157. . Employees and unions may act themselves in support of their rights, however because of collective action problems and the costs of litigation, the National Labor Relations Board is designed to assist and bear some of the costs. Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) protects the rights of union and nonunion employees to engage in protected concerted activities that address working conditions, wages, or discipline. Section 7 references "current and applicable standards." If those discussions occur using social media accounts (such as an employee’s Facebook or Twitter account), the discussions may be protected under the NLRA. A: Congress enacted the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) in 1935 to protect the rights of employees and employers, to encourage collective bargaining, and to limit certain labor and management practices that can harm the general welfare of workers, businesses, and the U.S. economy. . Q: What is Section 7 of the NLRA? The National Labor Relations Act (NLRA), enacted in 1935, was a major component of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal, and represented a sea change in national labor policy. January 22, 2019. If a piece of equipment meets a recognized European standard, a professional engineer licensed in Ontario must look at the standard in question to determine if following the standard achieves compliance with section 7 of the Industrial Establishments Regulation. 7. Of significance, joining several recent courts, the court considered the effect of the NLRA’s Section 7, as it. In addition to protecting workers, the act provides a framework for collective bargaining. On December 14, 2017, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) discarded its long-standing and employee-friendly approach to determining whether a facially neutral employer rule or policy unlawfully interferes with an employee’s right to engage in protected concerted activity under section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). Known initially as the Wagner Act, it followed three decades of debate over the role the federal government should play in … Portions of the NLRA that spell out violations, and result in unfair labor-practice charges, include:. For instance, Section 7 of the NLRA gives employees, among other things, the right to act together to try to improve their pay and working conditions, with or without a union. As everyone knows, gossip in the workplace is ubiquitous and inevitable — and can be devastating to an organization and individuals if it goes beyond a certain point. On January 11, 2019, the National Labor Relations Board issued an employer-friendly decision in Alstate Maintenance LLC, 367 NLRB 68 (2019), narrowing the scope of protection for employee complaints. concerted activities for the purpose of collective bargaining or other mutual aid or protection.” Section 8(a)(1) of the NLRA makes it an unfair labor practice “for an employer . Three years ago, I wrote a post asking whether it was a good idea for employers to institute workplace anti-gossip policies.